Jim Jester Sermons

R U Woke? Part 1

 
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The First Two Chapters in Genesis

Sermon notes by Jim Jester

October 3, 2021

Scripture Reading: Psalm 8:1-6

Genesis

Genesis is a book of beginnings. Its title comes from the Greek word meaning “origins,” “birth,” or “existence.” We should note that if you drop the last letters “sis” you have the word “gene” or “genes” (if you drop “is”). Surely, everyone recognizes this word.

Genesis, the first book found in the Bible, is key to everything else contained in the Bible. All Christians regardless of their theological persuasion or personal beliefs should remember this principle. Not to understand this key book is to misunderstand the intent and meaning of the whole Bible.

The Book of Genesis is highly symbolic; therefore, the subject of creation should not be approached from a scientific perspective. We should not read these chapters as chronological, astronomical, geological, or biological statements, but as spiritual, moral, or racial concepts. The Book therefore, is the account of God’s Covenant Creation for it begins a new era with Adam’s insertion into a world of chaos.

A Great Salvation

 
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Sermon notes of James Jester

September 5, 2021

Scripture Reading: I Samuel 19:1-6

This message serves as a conclusion to the series, Psalms for Turbulent Times.

The First Epistle of Peter, A Living Hope

Peter’s opening greeting lets us know who he is writing to:

“Peter, an apostle of Jesus Christ, to the strangers scattered throughout Pontus, Galatia, Cappadocia, Asia, and Bithynia, 2 Elect according to the foreknowledge of God the Father, through sanctification of the Spirit, unto obedience and sprinkling of the blood of Jesus Christ: Grace unto you, and peace, be multiplied.” (I Pet. 1:1-2)

The “strangers” here are those of the former northern house of Israel:

“The strangers scattered” — literally, “sojourners of the dispersion”; only in John 7:35 and James 1:1, in New Testament, and Psalm 147:2, “the outcasts of Israel” in the Septuagint; the designation peculiarly given to the Jews [Judeans] in their dispersed state throughout the world ever since the Babylonian captivity. These he, as the apostle of the circumcision, primarily addresses, but not in the limited temporal sense only; he regards their temporal condition as a shadow of their spiritual calling to be strangers and pilgrims on earth, looking for the heavenly Jerusalem as their home. (JFB commentary)

Psalms for Turbulent Times - Part 14

 
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PSALM 137

Jim Jester

August 8, 2021

Scripture Reading: Psalm 9:1-16

“Psalm 9 and 10 are really one Psalm. In several ancient manuscripts and versions, they appear as a single composition. The acrostic structure, though incomplete, points to the same fact. Here we have a mixture of literary types: hymn, thanksgiving, and lament, dealing with both national and domestic [individual] enemies.” – Layman’s Bible Commentary, p. 36

This Psalm, that we know as Psalms 9 & 10, goes quite well with Psalm 137, which we are also covering.

1. Thanksgiving (Ps. 9:1-4)

2. Hymn of Praise (Ps. 9:5-16)

3. Judgment upon the Nations (Ps. 9:17-20)

4. Lament (Ps. 10:1-4)

5. David’s Prayer (Ps. 10:12-18)

Psalms for Turbulent Times - Part 13

 
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PSALM 141

by Jim Jester

July 25, 2021

Scripture Liturgy: Psalm 123: 1-4

This psalm is primarily a lament for the community of Israel, and was likely used in the temple as a liturgy. The first statement is in the first person singular and may have been sung by a priest. The remainder of the psalm is in the first person plural and was probably sung by the congregation.

“Unto Thee … have I lifted up mine eyes” (v. 1). Hard and bitter trial may come in one or more of many ways; but the text points to that of oppression, the cruel treatment of the weaker by the stronger. This may come to us in different forms than the psalmist: the IRS, unfair judges; or more personal problems, such as extreme medical issues and the seemingly endless suffering it brings. Where shall we turn? If there be no escape from it, as there often is not, we must find our refuge in God. When we have vainly looked around for help from man, “we lift up our eyes” to God, to Him that “dwelleth in the heavens.”

  • We recognize the fact that He has power to deliver us.
  • We believe that in His wisdom, He can interpose on our behalf.
  • We are sure that our suffering is not a matter of indifference to His heart, and that our cry enters His ear.
  • We must not be impatient, if the time or method of our choice should not prove to be His chosen time or method of deliverance.
  • We do well to continue our prayer for relief “until He have pity upon us” and rescue us.
  • Meanwhile we should: 1) let our trouble draw us nearer to divine fellowship with our Lord; 2) loosen our tie to this present world; and 3) enable us to give to those that witness our course, another illustration of the upholding grace of God. – Pulpit Commentary

Psalms for Turbulent Times - Part 12

 
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PSALM 106

by Jim Jester

July 4, 2021

Scripture Reading: Psalm 43:1-5

Psalm 43

The Scripture we read is actually a Part 2, or a continuation of Psalm 42, likely written by one of the sons of Korah (the Korahites accompanied David in his flight beyond the Jordan during Absalom’s rebellion). Psalm 43 is likely a supplementary stanza, added later by the same or a different author. The absence of a title for this psalm, and the recurrence of several phrases, especially the refrain, “Why art thou cast down, O my soul and why art thou disquieted within me? Hope in God: for I shall yet praise him, who is the health of my countenance, and my God” (v. 5), puts this beyond doubt, as the verse is repeated 3 times. The separation is old since it is found in the LXX (Septuagint). Whoever wrote this psalm (both Psalms 42 & 43), has given immortal form to the longings of the soul after God. He has fixed forever and made melodious the sigh: “As the hart panteth after the water brooks, so panteth my soul after thee, O God” (Ps. 42:1).

Psalms for Turbulent Times - Part 11

 
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Psalm 94

By Jim Jester

June 6, 2021

Scripture Reading: Psalm 52:1-9

This lament of David is different than most. It does not start out with the usual appeal to God to hear the petition for deliverance; instead, the psalmist immediately launches into an attack on the wicked man whose only commitment is to his wealth, and then sets forth the happy status of the righteous whose ultimate commitment is to God. Yes, the steadfast love of our covenant God endures “like a green olive tree.”

The historical occasion (q.v., I Samuel 22) in the title of this psalm is important to its interpretation. In verses, 1-4 is the commitment of the wicked; verses 5-7 tell of his fate (Who’s fate?); and verses 8-9 reveals the resolve of the righteous.

Who is this evil “mighty man” spoken of in the first verse of the psalm?

Psalms for Turbulent Times - Part 10

 
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Psalm 90

by Jim Jester

May 16, 2021

Scripture Reading: Psalm 31:14-19

In this portion of Psalm 31, David confesses his faith in God, seeks deliverance from enemy persecution, and prays for the premature death of these enemies. “My times are in Thy hand,” means that God controls the events in his life and that He determines his future. David is trusting his God. “Let Thy face shine on thy servant” is an expression for a favorable response to his prayer; and is often found in Scripture. “Make thy face to shine upon thy servant; and teach me thy statutes” (Ps. 119:135). David expresses his gratitude in verse 19, “Oh how great is Thy goodness, which Thou hast laid up for them that fear Thee.”

To “fear” God is not necessarily a fear as we usually use the term, e.g., the fear of a fire or the fear of falling from a height. No doubt, God is to be feared by evildoers, for “It is a fearful thing to fall into the hands of the living God” (Heb. 10:31). But, to fear God is to respect and reverence Him by living in a holy or pious manner. Some synonyms for “piety” are: religious, godliness, devoutness, spirituality, saintliness, and reverence. These things true Christians aspire to and live by as much as possible.

Psalms for Turbulent Times - Part 9

 
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Psalm 83

by Pastor Jim Jester

May 2, 2021

Scripture Reading: Psalm 64:1-10

Psalm 64

In the Scripture we read, David’s meditation or complaint, we see how evil loves to plot in secret against God and His people. Ever hear of “secret societies,” e.g., the Free Masons? What about government agencies, e.g., the CIA and NSA? Presidents like to speak about their “openness” before the public, while the complete opposite is true.

The Democrats secretly plotted a steal of the election. They were the real insurrectionists or revolutionaries, not the Trump supporters of January 6. And, where is the cry of “police brutality” over the death of, Ashli Babbit, who came through a window at the capitol and was shot? What is the name of the shooter who killed her? Why isn’t it made known? Ah, we have a new administration in Washington. And even if some Trump supporters exhibited limited violence, was it not justifiable under the present conditions of: clear vote manipulation, the refusal of the courts, and a vice-president who did not have the “guts” to have certain states re-certify their fraudulent elections. Knowing American history, wouldn’t our founding fathers have agreed and been very angry? Wasn’t it an insurrection when we broke away from king George? Besides, there were no guns at the so-called “Trump insurrection.” How can one have an insurrection without guns?

Verses 1-6 of this Psalm are David’s petition for preservation. His enemies (the wicked), “whet their tongues like swords” and “aim bitter words like arrows,” shooting suddenly in ambush at the blameless. Some interpret these words as references to the casting of curses or spells by those who practice black magic. Which reminds me, aren’t masks magic?

Psalms for Turbulent Times - Part 8

 
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Psalm 80

by Jim Jester

April 11, 2021

Scripture Reading: Psalm 55:1-11

The historical event of Psalm 80 is uncertain; but again we have a national lament for the restoration of God’s people. Did you notice the repetition at the turning-points of the psalm, the refrain is repeated that God would “turn them again” and cause them to be saved, in verses 3, 7, 19. Note also the ascending climax of how God is addressed: God; God of Hosts; and, LORD, God of Hosts. So, when Scripture repeats itself, it is not always because of emphasis. It often has much more significance for us. And, we will see more examples as we proceed.

“Turn us again, O God (v. 3). Three times this prayer is repeated, but with slight, though noticeable, difference. Here, it is addressed only to God. But the second time (v. 7), it calls on God as “God of hosts.” The eye of faith in the psalmist saw the ministers of God’s power around him, the hosts of the holy angels who waited to do God’s will. Then the third time (v. 19), it is the “Lord God of hosts” on whom the psalmist calls, making mention of the covenant name (Yahweh, Jehovah, LORD, G-sus) by which God was known in Israel as their personal, familial, racial, God. Thus, the argument for faith – if God be our God, then He will help us. Therefore, be instant in prayer. “Praying always with all prayer and supplication in the Spirit, and watching thereunto with all perseverance and supplication for all saints” (Eph. 6:18).

Psalms for Turbulent Times - Part 7

 
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PSALM 79

by Pastor Jim Jester

March 14, 2021

Scripture Reading: Psalm 6:1-10

Through the centuries, the church has regarded Psalm 6 as the first of the seven Penitential Psalms. The psalmist was dreadfully sick and thought he was going to die. It was common in those days to believe that sickness unto death was in punishment for some sin. Now, while this is a possibility, it obviously is not always the case:

“And as Jesus passed by, he saw a man which was blind from his birth. And his disciples asked him, saying, Master, who did sin, this man, or his parents, that he was born blind? Jesus answered, Neither hath this man sinned, nor his parents: but that the works of God should be made manifest in him.” – John 9:1-3

However, the psalmist pleads with God to stop his chastisement. He speaks of his bones being troubled because his bones represent the whole man. His reference to flooding the bed with tears is a typical exaggeration made for emphasis. David pleads for deliverance by appealing to God’s steadfast love. He maintains that there is no praise to God while in the grave. His prayer is expressed in the words of Jeremiah, “O Lord, correct me, but with judgment [i.e., tempered judgment]; not in thine anger, lest thou bring me to nothing.” – Jer. 10:24

Psalms for Turbulent Times - Part 6

 
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Psalm 77

by Jim Jester

Scripture Reading: Psalm 142:1-7

In our scripture reading, David was praying while in the cave of Adullam. First Samuel chapter 22:

1 “David therefore departed thence, and escaped to the cave Adullam: and when his brethren and all his father’s house heard it, they went down thither to him. 2 And every one that was in distress, and every one that was in debt, and every one that was discontented, gathered themselves unto him; and he became a captain over them: and there were with him about four hundred men.” – I Sam. 22:1-2

God answered David’s prayer by sending him 400 (later 600, 1 Sam. 23:13) men to surround him. Notice how the common folk gathered around him, and the “discontented;” not a particularly savory group, but “deplorables.” It is the same today – most of the common working class of America have gathered around Trump who is now in exile in Florida (his “cave” in Mar-a-Lago). However, there must be times when Trump feels that “no man cared for my soul” (v. 4), when one by one those with political aims switched sides in betrayal and persecution. White America now faces discrimination and oppression from the Left.

I cried unto the LORD with my voice…” (v. 1). Have you ever literally cried before the Lord Jesus Christ? Certainly, there are times when all of us have come before the throne of God in such a manner, for one reason or another. This is good, and this is normal, for God has made us emotional people.

Psalms for Turbulent Times - Part 5

 
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Psalm 74

by Jim Jester

February 7, 2021

Scripture Reading: Psalm 28

If I could bring a State of the Union Address to America, I would say this.

My fellow Americans, Covid-19 is cover for a Communist coup! Resist! How long will you wear the mask of submission? One year, two years, or beyond? The so-called “experts” have already said it will never end. This PLANdemic is only the conditioning part of preparing you for an economic reset to take America into a communist state. It can end, if you dare to end it! 

Fear Not the Disease ... Fear the Dictatorship

Psalms for Turbulent Times - Part 4

 
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PSALM 60

by Pastor Jim Jester

January 10, 2021

Scripture Reading: Psalm 25:8-22

Psalm 25 David’s Lament

Our Scripture reading (Ps. 25:8-22), begins with the statement, “He will teach sinners in the way.” In this, King David is acknowledging his past and his many sins, and perhaps even present shortcomings and/or sins; but David’s heart is not as a rebellious type of “sinner”, but as a sinner who is humble enough to be taught by the Spirit of God. Thus, the next verse confirms this by saying, “The meek [humble] will He guide in judgment: and the meek will He teach His way” (v. 9). As people, we have not always been perfect, but we are learning; and we are humble enough to keep on learning of God’s perfect ways for us. These verses are not speaking of habitually sinful or rebellious people who reject God’s ways, or His forgiveness. God’s faithfulness and Covenant love are available for those who take seriously their Covenant relationship as expressed in the Law: “All the paths of the Lord are mercy and truth unto such as [those who] keep His covenant and His testimonies” (v. 10).

Psalms for Turbulent Times - Part 3

 
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PSALM 58

by Jim Jester

December 13, 2020

Scripture Reading: Psalm 13

What if America were a dictatorship, or perhaps a monarchy? A dictatorship usually has a negative connotation; and a monarchy, not as feared; but no matter what the case, it can be good or bad, depending upon the individual in charge. A dictatorship in America may sound preposterous and unthinkable because it is not a part of our constitution; but really, we have seen it before not too far back in our history; the prime example being the jew, Abraham Lincoln and the War Between the States.

Is it possible that America could come under a dictatorship? We wouldn’t think so; but this week I discovered something I had not previously known. It is a law revealed in the following post.

Psalms for Turbulent Times - Part 2

 
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PSALM 44

Jim Jester

November 22, 2020

Scripture Reading: Psalm 5

“To the chief Musician upon Nehiloth [flute or wind instruments: perforated pipe], A Psalm of David.

1 Give ear to my words, O LORD, consider my meditation.

2 Hearken unto the voice of my cry, my King, and my God: for unto thee will I pray. 3 My voice shalt thou hear in the morning, O LORD; in the morning will I direct my prayer unto thee, and will look up.

4 For thou art not a God that hath pleasure in wickedness: neither shall evil dwell with thee. 5 The foolish shall not stand in thy sight: thou hatest all workers of iniquity. 6 Thou shalt destroy them that speak lies: the LORD will abhor the bloody and deceitful man.

7 But as for me, I will come into thy house in the multitude of thy mercy: and in thy fear will I worship toward thy holy temple. 8 Lead me, O LORD, in thy righteousness because of mine enemies; make thy way straight before my face.

9 For there is no faithfulness in their mouth; their inward part is very wickedness; their throat is an open sepulchre; they flatter with their tongue. 10 Destroy thou them, O God; let them fall by their own counsels; cast them out in the multitude of their transgressions; for they have rebelled against thee.

11 But let all those that put their trust in thee rejoice: let them ever shout for joy, because thou defendest them: let them also that love thy name be joyful in thee. 12 For thou, LORD, wilt bless the righteous; with favour wilt thou compass him as with a shield.” – Psalm 5

The personal prayer of King David (Ps. 5) and the national lament and prayer of Israel (Ps. 44).

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