Jim Jester Sermons

R U Woke? Part 8

 
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Exodus

Sermon notes by Jim Jester

May 1, 2022

SCRIPTURE READING: Exodus 15:11-13 & 17-18

INTRODUCTION

Of all the books in the Bible, the book of Exodus ought to be the simplest book to recognize the racial implications contained therein. The message of identity is obvious in the language of Scripture, even though the judeo-Christian world refuses to acknowledge it. All we can say is “come now, let us reason together.”

In the “burning bush” experience, Moses meets the God of his fathers; and God says to him; “Come now therefore, and I will send thee unto Pharaoh, that thou mayest bring forth my people the children of Israel out of Egypt.” (Ex. 3:10)

The Israelites had been in Egypt 215 years (most say over 400 years); the twelve sons of Jacob/Israel had long passed on. Now the Israelites were a multitudinous number, feared by the Egyptians, and made slaves to Pharaoh. God spoke to Moses with the promise of deliverance for His people, the progeny of Israel. The deliverance (the salvation), was not for the Egyptians, but for the covenant people of God. “My people” denotes possession.

FGCP Church Discussion on Communion

 
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Does the Scripture Sanction the Sacraments? by Pastor Jim Jester

April 10, 2022

The question before us as a church is, does the Bible demand that we observe the alleged sacraments of the historic Christian faith?

Holy Communion by Pastor Don Elmore

There are different ways and different formulas that every church uses.  Which one is correct or are several correct?  Which ones are wrong?  They all can’t be correct.  Maybe none are correct. What are we as a covenant church to believe and do?

R U Woke? Part 7

 
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Chapter 38 of Genesis

Sermon notes by Jim Jester

Scripture Reading: Genesis 38:1-5

February 13, 2022

Introduction

This sermon brings us to the conclusion of the Genesis portion of the series. Upon studying through the book of Genesis, we have often discovered areas that were not quite clear or lacked specificity. We could even say, a bit confusing. Most of this we observed in the first sermon of this series where we covered the Gap Theory and the Second Account Theory of mankind; and then in the fourth and fifth parts, the Curse of Ham theory. It seems that this anomaly occurs more in Genesis than any other book of the Bible. Why? Besides jewish tampering of the Masoretic Text; age-old Christian tradition says that Moses wrote the book of Genesis out of eleven ancient documents available in his day, probably handed down from generation to generation. Genesis is composed of:

R U Woke? Part 6

 
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Chapter 34 of Genesis

Sermon notes by Jim Jester

January 23, 2022

Scripture Reading: Genesis 34:1-4

Our Scripture Reading is the opening paragraph of the account of Jacob’s interaction with the people in Canaan, sometimes referred to in Bible headings as “The Defiling of Dinah” (rape by a non-white). It is another example illustrating the racial context of the Bible. In this series, we are comparing Critical Race Theory with Biblical Race Theory, in an attempt to convince many good people that the current trend of race-mixing and miscegenation in America is against God’s Word; and actually helps our ancient foe.

R U Woke? Part 5

 
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Chapter 12 of Genesis

Sermon notes by Pastor Jim Jester

January 9, 2022

Scripture Reading: Isaiah 51:1-2

Introduction

Picking up from where I left off in the previous sermon, there are some other points to make concerning “the curse of Canaan” in Genesis.

The term “uncover nakedness” in Scripture usually refers to sexual contact, thus in this case, Ham had relations with his mother. Whatever actually happened in Genesis 9:20-25 we cannot be sure, but is left to speculation. It is true that when people are drunk and possibly passed out, they can easily be taken advantage of in a sexual way. But it is hard to prove if either Ham or his son Canaan did something like this. It could be that this case may not have been a sexual event at all.

R U Woke? Part 4

 
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Chapters 5-9 of Genesis

Sermon notes by Jim Jester

December 12, 2021

Scripture Reading: Genesis 5:1-2

Introduction

Many people have wondered why the Bible includes genealogical records. They have the impression that the Bible is a universal book for everyone; therefore, the question in the judeo-Christian mind is, “Why are these here? It doesn’t matter who you are.” Thus, they skip over these records as insignificant to the biblical revelation. But yet, these genealogies stand, in both the Old and New Testaments, staring us in the face, testifying to the racial context of the Bible.

The response most pastors give regarding genealogy is, “God cares about everybody and knows us by name.” That may sound sweet and caring, but that is not a serious response from a theological perspective. The serious Bible student knows that all Scripture must fit together as a harmonious and unified whole. This task is not always easy to do, and is why we end up with various different opinions and doctrinal positions among churches. 

But first:  In the News

Only PUREBLOODS will survive the vaccine / spike proteins cause genetic DISINTEGRATION — Natural News, Nov. 19, 2021

"Today’s podcast is a bombshell that needs to be understood by anyone hoping to survive the vaccine holocaust, because it’s really a “genetic bomb” against humanity."

R U Woke? Part 3

 
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CHAPTER 4 OF GENESIS

Sermon notes by Jim Jester

November 14, 2021

Scripture Reading: Genesis 4:1-5

Introduction

We have no idea how long Adam and Eve were in the garden of Eden before Satan appeared. It may have been a hundred years; it may have been a very short time. In any case, it was not until after the “forbidden fruit” episode that children were born to Eve. This is further evidence to support the sexual meaning of their disobedience to God’s command in the garden not to eat of the other “trees.”

In Eden, Satan spoke to Eve; and Eve spoke to Satan. God spoke to Adam and Eve; Adam and Eve spoke to God. Adam and Eve “heard the sound of God walking in the garden” (Gen. 3:8). They both hid from God. God made garments of skin for Adam and Eve. Satan beguiled Eve. These are all physical acts that we usually do not associate with purely spiritual beings. It is obvious that some “spiritual beings” have the capability of manifesting themselves in a physical way. Therefore, we believe that Satan had the physical ability to seduce and take Eve in a sexual way.

R U Woke? Part 2

 
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CHAPTER 3 OF GENESIS

Sermon notes by Jim Jester

October 31, 2021

Scripture Reading: Luke 10:17-20

Biden has said, “The greatest threat to America is White Supremacy.” No, the greatest threat is Democrats in control of the nation. Their voting policies imply that black people are “dumb” and white people are “racist.” Many political and religious leaders consider racism and white supremacy “unforgivable sins.” They are considered “woke” (their slang term meaning “awake to racial problems”). Are you woke? Christian Identity is already “woke,” i.e., awake to the racial context of the Bible. We challenge all judeo-Christians, and the public in general, to accept the reality of God’s Word on this subject.

Does the Bible have anything to say about “wokism” or “Critical Race Theory?” Well, it has much to say concerning critical race facts (and that is the purpose of this series). Those who are promoting CRT are the usual suspects, i.e., those of the satanic seed-line. Their purpose is a purely political agenda; not that they care about the plight of other races. Their religion is Covid, and their “vaccine” is the sacrament of induction to their cult.

R U Woke? Part 1

 
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The First Two Chapters in Genesis

Sermon notes by Jim Jester

October 3, 2021

Scripture Reading: Psalm 8:1-6

Genesis

Genesis is a book of beginnings. Its title comes from the Greek word meaning “origins,” “birth,” or “existence.” We should note that if you drop the last letters “sis” you have the word “gene” or “genes” (if you drop “is”). Surely, everyone recognizes this word.

Genesis, the first book found in the Bible, is key to everything else contained in the Bible. All Christians regardless of their theological persuasion or personal beliefs should remember this principle. Not to understand this key book is to misunderstand the intent and meaning of the whole Bible.

The Book of Genesis is highly symbolic; therefore, the subject of creation should not be approached from a scientific perspective. We should not read these chapters as chronological, astronomical, geological, or biological statements, but as spiritual, moral, or racial concepts. The Book therefore, is the account of God’s Covenant Creation for it begins a new era with Adam’s insertion into a world of chaos.

A Great Salvation

 
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Sermon notes of James Jester

September 5, 2021

Scripture Reading: I Samuel 19:1-6

This message serves as a conclusion to the series, Psalms for Turbulent Times.

The First Epistle of Peter, A Living Hope

Peter’s opening greeting lets us know who he is writing to:

“Peter, an apostle of Jesus Christ, to the strangers scattered throughout Pontus, Galatia, Cappadocia, Asia, and Bithynia, 2 Elect according to the foreknowledge of God the Father, through sanctification of the Spirit, unto obedience and sprinkling of the blood of Jesus Christ: Grace unto you, and peace, be multiplied.” (I Pet. 1:1-2)

The “strangers” here are those of the former northern house of Israel:

“The strangers scattered” — literally, “sojourners of the dispersion”; only in John 7:35 and James 1:1, in New Testament, and Psalm 147:2, “the outcasts of Israel” in the Septuagint; the designation peculiarly given to the Jews [Judeans] in their dispersed state throughout the world ever since the Babylonian captivity. These he, as the apostle of the circumcision, primarily addresses, but not in the limited temporal sense only; he regards their temporal condition as a shadow of their spiritual calling to be strangers and pilgrims on earth, looking for the heavenly Jerusalem as their home. (JFB commentary)

Psalms for Turbulent Times - Part 14

 
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PSALM 137

Jim Jester

August 8, 2021

Scripture Reading: Psalm 9:1-16

“Psalm 9 and 10 are really one Psalm. In several ancient manuscripts and versions, they appear as a single composition. The acrostic structure, though incomplete, points to the same fact. Here we have a mixture of literary types: hymn, thanksgiving, and lament, dealing with both national and domestic [individual] enemies.” – Layman’s Bible Commentary, p. 36

This Psalm, that we know as Psalms 9 & 10, goes quite well with Psalm 137, which we are also covering.

1. Thanksgiving (Ps. 9:1-4)

2. Hymn of Praise (Ps. 9:5-16)

3. Judgment upon the Nations (Ps. 9:17-20)

4. Lament (Ps. 10:1-4)

5. David’s Prayer (Ps. 10:12-18)

Psalms for Turbulent Times - Part 13

 
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PSALM 141

by Jim Jester

July 25, 2021

Scripture Liturgy: Psalm 123: 1-4

This psalm is primarily a lament for the community of Israel, and was likely used in the temple as a liturgy. The first statement is in the first person singular and may have been sung by a priest. The remainder of the psalm is in the first person plural and was probably sung by the congregation.

“Unto Thee … have I lifted up mine eyes” (v. 1). Hard and bitter trial may come in one or more of many ways; but the text points to that of oppression, the cruel treatment of the weaker by the stronger. This may come to us in different forms than the psalmist: the IRS, unfair judges; or more personal problems, such as extreme medical issues and the seemingly endless suffering it brings. Where shall we turn? If there be no escape from it, as there often is not, we must find our refuge in God. When we have vainly looked around for help from man, “we lift up our eyes” to God, to Him that “dwelleth in the heavens.”

  • We recognize the fact that He has power to deliver us.
  • We believe that in His wisdom, He can interpose on our behalf.
  • We are sure that our suffering is not a matter of indifference to His heart, and that our cry enters His ear.
  • We must not be impatient, if the time or method of our choice should not prove to be His chosen time or method of deliverance.
  • We do well to continue our prayer for relief “until He have pity upon us” and rescue us.
  • Meanwhile we should: 1) let our trouble draw us nearer to divine fellowship with our Lord; 2) loosen our tie to this present world; and 3) enable us to give to those that witness our course, another illustration of the upholding grace of God. – Pulpit Commentary

Psalms for Turbulent Times - Part 12

 
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PSALM 106

by Jim Jester

July 4, 2021

Scripture Reading: Psalm 43:1-5

Psalm 43

The Scripture we read is actually a Part 2, or a continuation of Psalm 42, likely written by one of the sons of Korah (the Korahites accompanied David in his flight beyond the Jordan during Absalom’s rebellion). Psalm 43 is likely a supplementary stanza, added later by the same or a different author. The absence of a title for this psalm, and the recurrence of several phrases, especially the refrain, “Why art thou cast down, O my soul and why art thou disquieted within me? Hope in God: for I shall yet praise him, who is the health of my countenance, and my God” (v. 5), puts this beyond doubt, as the verse is repeated 3 times. The separation is old since it is found in the LXX (Septuagint). Whoever wrote this psalm (both Psalms 42 & 43), has given immortal form to the longings of the soul after God. He has fixed forever and made melodious the sigh: “As the hart panteth after the water brooks, so panteth my soul after thee, O God” (Ps. 42:1).

Psalms for Turbulent Times - Part 11

 
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Psalm 94

By Jim Jester

June 6, 2021

Scripture Reading: Psalm 52:1-9

This lament of David is different than most. It does not start out with the usual appeal to God to hear the petition for deliverance; instead, the psalmist immediately launches into an attack on the wicked man whose only commitment is to his wealth, and then sets forth the happy status of the righteous whose ultimate commitment is to God. Yes, the steadfast love of our covenant God endures “like a green olive tree.”

The historical occasion (q.v., I Samuel 22) in the title of this psalm is important to its interpretation. In verses, 1-4 is the commitment of the wicked; verses 5-7 tell of his fate (Who’s fate?); and verses 8-9 reveals the resolve of the righteous.

Who is this evil “mighty man” spoken of in the first verse of the psalm?

Psalms for Turbulent Times - Part 10

 
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Psalm 90

by Jim Jester

May 16, 2021

Scripture Reading: Psalm 31:14-19

In this portion of Psalm 31, David confesses his faith in God, seeks deliverance from enemy persecution, and prays for the premature death of these enemies. “My times are in Thy hand,” means that God controls the events in his life and that He determines his future. David is trusting his God. “Let Thy face shine on thy servant” is an expression for a favorable response to his prayer; and is often found in Scripture. “Make thy face to shine upon thy servant; and teach me thy statutes” (Ps. 119:135). David expresses his gratitude in verse 19, “Oh how great is Thy goodness, which Thou hast laid up for them that fear Thee.”

To “fear” God is not necessarily a fear as we usually use the term, e.g., the fear of a fire or the fear of falling from a height. No doubt, God is to be feared by evildoers, for “It is a fearful thing to fall into the hands of the living God” (Heb. 10:31). But, to fear God is to respect and reverence Him by living in a holy or pious manner. Some synonyms for “piety” are: religious, godliness, devoutness, spirituality, saintliness, and reverence. These things true Christians aspire to and live by as much as possible.

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